An Unabashed Sales Pitch for Author Events

Tom Franklin and Beth Ann Fennelly reading from The Tilted World

Tom Franklin and Beth Ann Fennelly reading from The Tilted World

Author events are often memorable experiences; when things go right, they can be magical. (I dislike calling them “readings” or “signings”. Yes, author events almost always include reading and signing — but events that truly connect readers and authors involve much more than that.) There’s something very special about meeting an author and hearing him or her read from and discuss a beloved book.  I feel very fortunate I’ve had the chance to hear some incredible authors read from their work — Chris Bohjalian, Ann Hood, Elizabeth Berg, M.L. Stedman, Jan-Philipp Sendker, Gillian Flynn, Bob Spitz, Melanie Benjamin, Lisa Genova, Robert Kurson . . . too many to list. I’ll never forget choking up as I listened to Richard Russo describing how his mother’s example taught him to fall in love with reading.

However . . . so much can go wrong with author events. Maybe hardly anyone shows up, and it’s embarrassing and awkward for all involved. Perhaps the author reads . . . and reads . . . and reads, not noticing that the audience is shifting in their seats. Maybe the author gives a terrific presentation, reads a lovely teaser from the book, answers some interesting questions . . . and then everyone departs without buying the book. Or possibly we’ve misjudged the size of the crowd, and we run out of chairs — or worse, books.  And there are the inevitable  problems that prevent authors from arriving at the venue: flight cancellations, traffic jams, weather issues (which have included flooding and blizzards), and family emergencies. We organized an event with ornithologist David Sibley and his plane suffered a bird strike. You just can’t anticipate everything that might happen.

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Anton DiSclafani at a luncheon in her honor

Almost without exception, authors are gracious and delightful people, surprisingly skilled at public speaking and answering questions from readers. (I say “surprisingly” because I imagine many of them are introverts and need to make a huge effort to be outgoing.) I’m sure they hear the same questions over and over: “What’s your writing routine””; “Where do you get your ideas?”; “What have you been reading lately?”; “What’s your next book about?”; ad infinitum — but they nearly always respond warmly and enthusiastically.

At a booksellers’ conference, I once was seated at a lunch table with six or seven authors. They spent the entire meal one-upping each other with tales of their most humiliating events. I had a few anecdotes of my own to add — including the time the author told the audience not to buy the book from our store, because it was “cheaper on Amazon”.

Without getting involved in a discussion about Amazon (which is far beyond the scope of this blog post), let me say one thing: Amazon does not bring authors to your community. Publishers decide which authors to send on tour and then pay for them to come to a bookstore, library, or community center near you. Someone from your local bookstore coordinates the arrangements with the publisher,  finds a location, orders the books, publicizes the event — and then crosses his or her fingers that you show up,  and maybe even buy the book the author is promoting. More often than not, author events are free. I’ve attended more than I can count, and I don’t think I’ve ever left thinking that I wasted my time — even when I thought the event was close to disastrous. There’s always something to learn.

I know not everyone is lucky enough to live in an area where author events are frequently held. I am envious of New Yorkers, who seem to have dozens of events to choose from every day of the week. As publishers’ budgets get tighter, fewer and fewer authors are sent on tour. Some authors go on the road at their own expense, organizing their travel and gratefully accepting invitations from book clubs. There are very few prima donnas among authors. (We did have a request from one well-known author for a particular brand of tea, but that’s unusual.) I hope you have the chance to go to an author event soon — it’s the best entertainment bargain available!

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5 thoughts on “An Unabashed Sales Pitch for Author Events

  1. Thanks to all the independant booksellers that take the time to organize these events! Readers appreciate the effort and commend you for giving us the opportunity to meet the authors. I suspect the authors enjoy the events also, even the silly one who forgot who his host was!

  2. Author events are super fun. These talented people usually have fun personalities too so it is a good time go to listen to them answer questions and talk about their work.

  3. Thank you so much for sharing your perspective! Living in Portland I was able to go to many events and witnessed pretty much everything you mentioned. The low attendance is the worst and makes me as a reader feel terrible. I am so appreciative of both my independent book stores for hosting these events and for the authors putting themselves out there.

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